Friday, July 3, 2015

Martin Adsit Fought for Independence - 52 Ancestors #27

For this week's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks writing challenge from blogger Amy Crow Johnson of No Story Too Small, the theme is Independent, as in Independence Day! Which ancestor fought for America’s independence?

I have several Revolutionary War ancestors. I have previously blogged about 4th great grandfather, John Gorin (my DAR patriot), 4th great grandfather, Noah Davenport and 5th great grandfather, John Willet.

Another 4th great grandfather who served in the Revolution is Martin Adsit.

The NSDAR (National Society Daughters of the American Revolution) Genealogical Research System Ancestor Search summarizes Martin Adsit's service as:
Service Source: Roberts, NY in the Rev, p 70
Service Description: 1) Col Wessenfield [sic: should read Weissenfels]

New York in the Revolution as Colony and State can be found at Google Books with Martin Adsit listed as an enlisted man in "The Levies" under Colonel Frederick Weissenfels (page 54). (Col. Weissenfels has an article at Wikipedia.) The Weissenfels' Regiment of Levies (1781–82) was a militia unit from New York which fought in support of the American cause.

At Ancestry.com, there is an index for the Muster and Pay Rolls of the War of the Revolution, 1775-1783 indicating that Martin Adsit, serving under [Frederick] Wissenfells, was listed as a patient in the General Hospital at Albany between October 31, 1781 and November 7, 1781, with a fever.

I have not been able to determine if Martin participated in any battles. It appears that "Levies" were a group of soldiers selected from the ranks of the militia for additional training. These troops were then used to fill in the ranks of regular troops or as independent units. Often Levies served in the forts along the frontier counties in New York in order to stop raids carried out by Indian forces and Loyalists led by British officers.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Stephen Ashby (d. 1829) - 52 Ancestors #26

For this week's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks writing challenge from blogger Amy Crow Johnson of No Story Too Small, the theme is Halfway: This week marks the halfway point in the year — and the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge! What ancestor do you have that you feel like you’ve only researched halfway?

First of all, I am pleased with myself that I've kept up with this 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge. I am on track to writing as many posts in 2015 as I did in 2012, my most prolific year.

This week, I am sharing what little I know about a third great-grandfather, Stephen Ashby. Most of what I know about him is from The Ashby Book, Vol. 1: Descendants of Captain Thomas Ashby of Virginia (1976), compiled by Lee Fleming Reese, which is digitized and available at FamilySearch.org's Family History Books, a wonderful resource! However, this is a secondary source, so I feel that I've only researched this family halfway because I should really explore the primary source material.

Stephen Ashby was born in about 1805 (or possibly earlier) to Daniel Ashby and Mary Polly Benson. (See Surname Saturday: Ashby for more about my Ashby line.)

Sunday, June 21, 2015

James Hunter Obituary (d. 1902) - 52 Ancestors #25

For this week's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks writing challenge from blogger Amy Crow Johnson of No Story Too Small, the theme is The Old Homestead. I'm taking liberties with this theme, and writing about an ancestor who built homes for a living, including the one mentioned in the following obituary.

My second great-grandfather, James Hunter, lived in Allegheny City (now North Side of Pittsburgh) his entire life. I never knew that much about his life other than what census records and city directories provided me (his occupation was in construction), that he had ten children, and that he died before reaching 60 years old. (See his FindAGrave Memorial.)

My new favorite resource is Newspapers.com, which I decided to subscribe to because it includes many Pittsburgh newspapers. One of the first names I searched for was James Hunter in 1902 (his death year), and I found a wonderful obituary that really "puts the meat on the bones" in terms of giving us much more of a sense of the man.

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Tombstone Tuesday ~ Mary Rosekrans Adsit (1868-1869)

Mary Rosekrans Adsit is my second cousin twice removed. She died at 20 or 21 months old and has a very interesting gravestone, at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn.


Monday, June 15, 2015

Heirlooms from Marion Alston (d. 1885) - 52 Ancestors #24

For this week's 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks writing challenge from blogger Amy Crow Johnson of No Story Too Small, the theme is Heirloom.

I have many family heirlooms and I am lucky that I have ancestors who saved treasures and passed them down. A little over a year ago, I received the following small box from my mother.


Fittings off Mother's Glasses.

On this small box is the handwriting of my great-grandmother, Marguerite (Lysle) Hunter (1876-1967), referring to her mother, Marion Helen (Alston) Lysle, who died in May of 1885, in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, when Marguerite was not quite nine years old and her brother, George Barton Lysle, was not quite seven.